controversy-with-the-new-tiktok-streaming-software:-it-is-shown-to-use-code-from-obs-studio,-violating-…-!

Controversy with the new TikTok streaming software: it is shown to use code from OBS Studio, violating … -!

Controversy with the new TikTok streaming software: it is shown to use OBS Studio code, violating … -!: All the details about Controversy with the new TikTok streaming software: it is shown that it uses OBS Studio code, violating … -! are on topwhich.com. I am happy to present you all the developments about Controversy with the new TikTok streaming software: it is shown to use code from OBS Studio, violating … -!. Here’s what you need to know about Controversy with the new TikTok streaming software: it is shown to use OBS Studio code, violating … -!, Here are the details … The Last Friday we echoed the launch of TikTok Live Studio, the new desktop application for streaming video games developed by those responsible for the popular social network of short videos with the aim of to start competing with Twitch and YouTube Gaming.

However, now this software is back in the news, and not because it has left the current private beta phase … but because not all the credit for its development belongs to the programmers hired by ByteDance . As reported on Twitter, the streamers Naaackers, TikTok Live Studio (or rather parts of it) would be nothing more than an unrecognized fork of OBS Studio , a popular software for recording and streaming.

ByteDance seems not to know that the GPL is a ‘viral’ license

¿ Why is this problematic? Well, because OBS is free software (which, of course, allows us to create our own forks) … but that also means, in this case, that it is subject to the GPL (GNU software license) that requires sharing the source code of any derivative product.

That is why the GPL is classified as a ‘viral license’: any derived from a GPL software is ‘infected’ with the same four freedoms (of use, distribution, access to the code, and modification) that it guarantees . This prevents, for example, that companies can reuse free code in their own proprietary products (not all free licenses are so restrictive in this sense).

Some users are talking about “TikTok has stolen OBS”. The term ‘theft’ is inaccurate and exaggerated in this case … but yes, there has been a license violation of the OBS code by ByteDance .

So a spokesperson for the OBS development team has decided to intervene in the debate on networks to redirect it, making it clear that they are committed to a policy based on addressing violations of the GPL assuming good faith for the other party :

“In the case of TikTok / Bytedance, we will be happy to have a friendly working relationship with them as long as they comply with the license. ”

In Hacker News, another member of the OBS team explained the reasons why they had analyzed the files of the TikTok Live Studio installation in search of evidence of use of their work:

“I saw a tweet yesterday from someone who is on the beta version, and as with any live streaming desktop software (and especially with “Studio” in the name) I was curious if they were using any OBS Studio code or if they had developed everything internally.

The ‘DNA’ of OBS comes to light when analyzing the installation files of TikTok Live Studio.

“Without even installing it, when opening the configuration files I immediately noticed red flags , in particular files like ‘GameDetour 64. dll ‘,’ Inject 64. exe ‘and’ MediaSDKGetWinDXOffset 64. exe ‘which are terribly similar to the way our game capture system works in OBS Studio, based on’ graphics-hook 64. dll ‘,’ inject-helper 64 .exe ‘and’ get-graphics-offsets 64. exe ‘”.

“I am not in the business of checking these things in everything I find, but when something is so obvious, it requires more investigation, and after a bit of decompilation I was able to confirm that the OBS code was present in their binaries “.

For now ByteDance has not officially ruled on the matter , although we will be awaiting any news that may arise.